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sunflower seeds

Just a quarter-cup of sunflower seeds contains about 62% of your daily value for vitamin E - which is the body’s primary fat-soluble antioxidant. Vitamin E travels throughout the body neutralizing/conjugating toxins (free radicals). It also has anti-inflammatory properties that may help reduce symptoms of asthma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as reduce risk of colon cancer and cardiovascular disease. Sunflower seeds are also a great source of magnesium and selenium, two other great antioxidants! Magnesium - may help calm nerves, muscles, and blood vessels, lower severity of asthma, lower high blood pressure, and prevent migraine headaches, as well as reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke. Insufficient magnesium can contribute to high blood pressure, muscle spasms or cramps, fatigue and headaches. Moreover, selenium brings along significant detox properties and improved cancer prevention. So much health for such popular seeds, nice thinking baseball players!


Health Benefits
protects cell membranes, brain cells, and cholesterol from free radical damage, anti-inflammatory, reduce symptoms of asthma, anti-cancer, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis support, healthy skin, reduce blood levels of cholesterol, menopause support, prevent migraines, reduce risk of heart attack or stroke, healthy bones, energy boosting, decrease muslce cramps, improve detox.
Nutrients
vitamin E, magnesium, selenium, vitamin B1, manganese, copper, tryptophan, vitamin B6, phosphorus, folate, phytosterolas
Did you know?
Native Americans used these seeds as a food and oil source, but they also used the flowers, roots, and stems for many other purposes, like color dye.

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sesame seeds (black)

Open sesame! Sesame seeds are thought to be the first crop harvested for oil and used as a condiment. Which makes sense, since sesame seeds provide such a great, yet subtle nutty flavor that enriches many recipes (like our Carrot Ginger Dressing!). We like to say “enrich” because sesame seeds may be tiny, but they sure are mighty! Specifically, sesame seeds are full of heart healthy fats, copper, manganese, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, & zinc. Additionally, sesame seeds also provide two very unique and amazing fibers - sesamin and sesamolin - which have been connected to lowering LDL or bad cholesterol, promoting liver and heart health, and increasing vitamin E concentrations in the body. Cool? We think so too! These nutrient-dense seeds are definitely ones to write home about.


Health Benefits
may provide relief for rheumatoid arthritis and prevent high blood pressure, promotes vascular, respiratory, bone, liver, heart, & skin health, supplies anti-inflammatory & cholesterol lowering properties, and may increase vitamin E concentrations and absorption
Nutrients
healthy fatty acids, copper, manganese, tryptophan, calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, thiamin, zinc, selenium, & unique fibers (sesamin and sesamolin).
Did you know?
The famous quote - “Open Sesame” – is actually referring to the sesame seed pod that bursts open upon maturity.

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pepita seeds

Pepita seeds, also known as pumpkin seeds, sure are scrumdiddlyumptious! Rich in tryptophan, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, protein, iron, B-complex vitamins, vitamin A, and vitamin K, pepita seeds make for the perfect nutrient-dense addition to homemade trail mix and baked goods. Not to mention, these mighty seeds are also rich in a uniquely diverse antioxidant content - including vitamin E (in 5 different forms) as well as zinc, manganese, and phenolic and phytonutrient antioxidants. Pretty fly for little seeds.


Health Benefits
provides anti-inflammatory, detoxifying, antimicrobial, & anti-cancer properties, & may help with insulin regulation
Nutrients
heart healthy fatty acids, tryptophan, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, protein, iron, B-complex vitmains, vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocomonoenol, and gamma-tocomonenol), zinc, manganese, & lignans
Did you know? 
Pepita seeds contain 5 different forms of vitamin E: alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, delta-tocopherol, alpha-tocomonoenol, and gamma-tocomonenol.

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flaxseeds (brown)

Flaxseeds, more like “flex” seeds! These little babies are the perfect addition to any smoothie or baked good! Jam-packed with omega-3 fatty acids, mucilage, and lignans, what’s not to love? Omega-3 fatty acids are what we like to call “good” fats, supplying anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular benefits, while mucilage, a water-soluble, gel-forming fiber, can slow down the emptying of the stomach - helping the intestines absorb more nutrients and making you feel fuller longer! And let’s not forget about lignans – what are lignans you ask – well, they’re fiber-like compounds that act as antioxidants and phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens (“phyto” = plant / phytoestrogens = plant estrogens) naturally act as weak to moderate estrogens when consumed, which may, in fact, help reduce the risk of hormone-related cancer and menopausal symptoms. So we ask you… “flax” or “flex?


Health Benefits
provides anti-inflammatory properties, cardiovascular benefits, reduces risk of hormone-related cancers, may help with menopausal symptoms (like hot flashes), aids in weight loss, increases intestinal absorption of nutrients, keeps you fuller longer, promotes good digestion, helps with blood sugar regulation, may help lower blood pressure and reduce hypertension, and may help reduce the risk of skin cancer
Nutrients
omega-3 fatty acids, manganese, thiamin, soluble and insoluble fiber (including mucilage), magnesium, tryptophan, phosphorus, copper, lignans
Did you know?
The best form of flaxseed to consume (in order to amplify the health benefits and absorption) is ground flaxseed or flaxseed meal.

chia seeds

When you think chia seeds, what comes to mind? "Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia" the Chia Pet tune? Well start thinking differently, these chia seeds are so much more than just Chia Pets, they are nutrient dense warriors! Many people strive to obtain omega-3 and protein through animal products because they don’t believe that they can get enough from a plant-based diet. However, chia seeds prove the contrary. Chia seeds are one of the highest plant-based sources of fiber, omega-3, and protein out there. One tablespoon provides 6 grams of fiber, 2.9 grams of omega-3 and 3 grams of protein! “Ch-Ch-Ch-Healthy!


Health Benefits
promotes a healthy digestion, keeps you fuller longer, aids in weight loss, fights belly fat and bloat, insulin regulating properties that promotes blood sugar maintenance, and lowers blood pressure, cholesterol, and risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases
Nutrients
Dietary fiber, protein, omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, phosphorus, manganese, zinc, iron, and omega-6 fatty acids
Did you know?
Chia seeds are very trendy right now because of their effective ability to aid in weight loss. These small little seeds are able to absorb about ten times their weight in liquid once eaten, making you feel fuller quicker and longer.

buckwheat noodles

Buckwheat is considered a gluten-free whole grain (but it has also been called a grain-like seed) that's rich in nutritionally complete protein – containing most, if not all, of the essential amino acids. It's a great addition to cereals, granola, baking products, and smoothie toppers.


Health Benefits
promotes cardiovascular health, provides anti-inflammatory & anti-cancer properties, may also help contribute to blood sugar control.
Nutrients
fiber, magnesium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, folate, tryptophan, pantothenic acid, niacin, vitamin B6, protein, iron, flavonoids, phenolics
Did you know?
Buckwheat, also known as “kasha,” is actually not a grain, it’s really a fruit seed related to rhubard and sorrel.

buckwheat groats

Buckwheat is considered a gluten-free whole grain (but it has also been called a grain-like seed) that's rich in nutritionally complete protein – containing most, if not all, of the essential amino acids. It's a great addition to cereals, granola, baking products, and smoothie toppers.


Health Benefits
promotes cardiovascular health, provides anti-inflammatory & anti-cancer properties, may also help contribute to blood sugar control.
Nutrients
fiber, magnesium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, folate, tryptophan, pantothenic acid, niacin, vitamin B6, protein, iron, flavonoids, phenolics
Did you know?
Buckwheat, also known as “kasha,” is actually not a grain, it’s really a fruit seed related to rhubard and sorrel.

Alfalfa sprouts

Alfalfa sprouts may be tiny, but they sure are mighty! These leafy seeds, shoots, or legumes (sources list them under all three) are packed with concentrated amounts of nutrients like vitamin A, niacin, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin K, B vitamins, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, and vitamin E. Not to mention, alfalfa sprouts are also a surprisingly good source of plant-based protein… yep! Now, they may be mild and weirdly textured for some, but for others they are gourmet - adding them to sandwiches, wraps, and salads, it’s sometimes just what’s needed to complete the meal!


Health Benefits
Promotes bone & muscle health, regulates blood clotting, boosts the immune system, helps lower LDL "bad" cholesterol, aids in weight loss, helps reduce symptoms of menopause & risk of heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis, as well as, helps keep calcium in bones and activates osteocalcin.
Nutrients
protein, calcium, potassium, vitamin K, vitamin C, saponins, fiber, vitamin A, vitamin B6, magnesium, iron, copper, vitamin E, zinc, pantothenic acid, folate, phytoestrogens, niacin, and thiamin

Did you know?

According to the California Alfalfa and Forage Association, "The name 'alfalfa' comes from Arabic, Persian, and Kashmiri words meaning 'best horse fodder' and 'horse power.